Mixed Methods: Assembling Mixed Methods Studies, Exemplified by Surveys and Interviews

Mixed Methods: Assembling Mixed Methods Studies, Exemplified by Surveys and Interviews
Mixed Methods: Assembling Mixed Methods Studies, Exemplified by Surveys and Interviews

Principal speaker

Dr Judy Rose

In this workshop we demonstrate how to assemble mixed methods studies involving surveys and interviews. By assembling we mean putting together different components of a mixed methods study, including how qualitative and quantitative components combine, how data collected is "mixed" across qualitative and quantitative components and how results are integrated. Other workshops go into the detail of how data would be collected to inform particular qualitative and quantitative. This workshop presents an array of Mixed Methods designs used for the mixing of survey and interview data within a research study. Assembling Mixed Methods typically involves a consideration of: purpose (e.g. exploratory or explanatory), timing (e.g. concurrent or sequential), emphasis (e.g. qual or quant driven) and mixing (e.g. triangulating results). The other aspects that are particularly relevant to surveys & interviews are timing of phases (e.g. surveys before interviews or vice-versa) and integration (e.g. survey outcomes inform the interview questions and sample). We present several examples of Mixed Methods studies in different fields including the Social (Clark et al., 2019) and Natural Sciences (Farmer et al., 2011), Health (Fetters et al., 2013), and Education (Hall & Ryan, 2011); then explore how qual and quant components are assembled in sequential, parallel, and embedded designs. We show that assembling a Mixed Methods study may be pre-specified, e.g. separate survey and interviewing components specified in advance. Alternatively, we show that it may be iterative, e.g. survey results identify the key areas that shape the interview questions (Zhang et al., 2018). Finally, we cover analytic points of integration, including ways Mixed Methods results and findings are assembled to establish corroboration, elaboration, convergence, divergence or dissonance. Examples are provided of how this can be written up and reported. This workshop is suitable for those new to Mixed Methods, along with those who are currently using this approach and wish to find out more about it.

Format: This workshop will be delivered online during a 2-hour period, with small group work via breakout rooms and other active learning.

Pre-requisite: Participants will benefit from the foundations provided in Introducing Mixed Methods, Refining Conceptual Frameworks for Research Design and Visualizing Conceptual Frameworks for Quantitative & Qualitative Research.

Optional Readings for the examples presented in the workshop.

Clark, R. S., & Clark, V. L. P. (2019). Grit within the context of career success: A mixed methods study. International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology, 4(3), 91-111.

Farmer, J. R., Chancellor, C., & Fischer, B. C. (2011). Motivations for using conservation easements as a land protection mechanism: a mixed methods analysis. Natural Areas Journal, 31(1), 80-87.

Fetters, M. D., Curry, L. A., & Creswell, J. W. (2013). Achieving integration in mixed methods designs-principles and practices. Health services research, 48(6pt2), 2134-56.Hall, J. N., & Ryan, K. E. (2011). Educational accountability: A qualitatively driven mixed-methods approach. Qualitative Inquiry, 17(1), 105-115.

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RSVP on or before Wednesday 5 August 2020 , by email RED@griffith.edu.au, or by phone 0755529107 , or via https://events.griffith.edu.au/d/z7qlvs/4W

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