Measuring the uptake of temperature monitoring technologies in Australian mango supply chains

Griffith University is undertaking this research to examine the use of digital technologies in horticulture and provide insight into factors influencing uptake of digital technologies in Australian mango supply chains. This research will assist industry and Government departments design and implement technology solutions targeted to the real needs of the horticulture industry.

Photo of mangoes for sale, taken at a major supermarket chain on 9 August 2018. (Photo supplied)

Given the delicate characteristics of fresh produce and the fast nature of mango trade, there is a pressing need for the industry to adopt digital temperature monitoring technology to maintain product integrity along the supply chain.

These technologies can enhance supply chain efficiencies, reduce waste, and improve industry profitability by delivering better products to end-consumers.

Edith Gomez, PhD candidate in the Department of International Business and Asian Studies is inviting businesses involved in the growing, packing, transport, ripening, wholesaling, retailing, and exporting of fresh mangoes are invited to participate in the “Adoption of temperature monitoring technologies in Australian mango supply chains” survey.

Working closely with her supervisors, Dr Louis Sanzogni, Dr Kuldeep Sandhu from Griffith University and Professor Daryl Joyce from the University of Queensland, Ms Gomez said, “Our aim is to help those in the mango supply chain avoid presenting fresh produce to customers that is unsuitable for sale.”

“In the past, technologies that affected entire supply chains have at times been developed without the input from all sectors of the chain,” she said. “That’s why we are interested in finding out about the views of everyone along the way.”

“Knowing about how technologies are currently used in the various processes will assist governments, researchers and industry peak bodies to tailor technologies accordingly.”

As an incentive, participants who complete the survey will have the option to register in the draw to win one of three temperature data loggers valued at $80-$200.

A temperature data logger is a small, portable instrument that records the temperature of produce over a set period of time that can then be retrieved and evaluated to ensure compliance with national standards. Some even come with built-in display or out-of-tolerance warning.

The survey will be open from 22 August to 22 November 2018.

If you are a member of the mango supply chain, please click here to access the survey, or email edith.gomezquintanilla@griffithuni.edu.au if you would like further information about the research.